Off-Topic: The Maserati Theory of Development

In the run-up to release of the Post-2015 development framework, the Sustainable Development Goals, one concept has come up several times: the differential responsibilities of developed and developing countries.  According to the Open Working Group tasked with drafting the proposed Goals and associated indicators, “Each country has primary responsibility for its own economic and social development and the role of national policies, domestic resources and development strategies cannot be overemphasized. Developing countries need additional resources for sustainable development” (emphasis mine). Thus, “developed countries” will be financing the sustainable development of “developing countries.”  Which is correct and proper.  But how to distinguish between a developed country and a developing country?

Ask any development professional to name all of the developing countries and he or she will produce a list that mostly agrees with any other development professional’s list.  I would assume that we can agree as a community on about 75 – 80% of the countries that would qualify as “developing.”  It’s on the margins between “developing” and “developed” that we might disagree.  For example, there are more poor people in India than anywhere else in the world, but India’s economy is one of the largest in the world.  Is India developed or developing?  Are Kenya and Nigeria with two of the three largest economies in Sub-Saharan Africa developed countries, like South Africa, or developing countries like their immediate neighbors?  These are the debates that will consume much of the negotiations as countries try to position themselves to benefit from the resources that are made available to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.  There will be many good and reasonable arguments on both sides as the status of these and other countries are decided. However, we will not have a long time for these debates as the final Goals will be approved in less than a year.  Therefore, I propose a simple test to determine whether or not a country should be classified as “developed” or “developing”: Does the country sustain a Maserati or Ferrari dealership?

This question came to me when I was working in El Salvador and learned that a new Maserati dealership was opening in San Salvador.  At first I was dismayed at the thought that Maserati would even consider opening a dealership in a country which had only recently suffered civil war and natural disasters, but then I figured that the bigwigs back in Italy had done their homework and knew that the conditions in El Salvador were ripe for sales.  As such, we in the development community can use the presence of Italian super car dealerships, specifically Maserati, Ferrari or Lamborghini, as a marker for certain preconditions in a country, but we’ll keep the name “Maserati Theory of Development” because Maserati was the inspiration.

In order for a country to have a Maserati, Ferrari or Lamborghini dealership, we can reasonably assume the following:

  1. There is a cohort of individuals in the country who can actually afford enough of the cars to make the investment in a dealership (as opposed to one-by-one imports) a reasonable business decision;
  2. The quality of roads and infrastructure, especially road repair, in the country are high enough not to damage a car with a low chassis;
  3. Skilled workers are sufficient to conduct maintenance on the vehicles;
  4. The security situation is stable enough that luxury car drivers are not instantly targeted for theft;
  5. Banking system is secure enough to allow for payment transfers to be made reliably, both within the country and back to Italy;
  6. This would not be the first luxury car dealership to open in a country. That would be Mercedes.

So, what countries should be considered “developed” countries under the Maserati Theory?  Below is a list of all countries with a Maserati, Ferrari or Lamborghini dealership according to the companies’ websites (Maserati; Lamborghini; Ferrari).  All countries with a Maserati dealership also have a Ferrari dealership; countries in bold have a Lamborghini dealer only.  The numbers next to the countries are their rankings on the 2014 Human Development Index.  Worth noting, the “most developed” country, Norway, does not have a Maserati, Ferrari or Lamborghini dealership…

  • Australia                            2
  • Switzerland                       3
  • Netherlands                      4
  • United States                    5
  • Germany                            6
  • New Zealand                     7
  • Canada                               8
  • Singapore                      9
  • Denmark                           10
  • Sweden                              12
  • United Kingdom              14
  • South Korea                     15
  • Japan                                 17
  • Israel                                  19
  • France                                20
  • Austria                               21
  • Belgium                             21
  • Slovenia                             25
  • Italy                                    26
  • Spain                                  27
  • Czech Republic                28
  • Greece                               29
  • Qatar                                 31
  • Cyprus                           32
  • Estonia                          33
  • Saudi Arabia                    34
  • Poland                               35
  • United Arab Emirates    40
  • Portugal                            41
  • Hungary                            43
  • Bahrain                             44
  • Kuwait                               46
  • Argentina                          49
  • Romania                            54
  • Oman                                 56
  • Russian Federation         57
  • Malaysia                        62
  • Mauritius                          63
  • Lebanon                            65
  • Panama                             65
  • Venezuela                         67
  • Turkey                               69
  • Mexico                               71
  • Azerbaijan                         76
  • Jordan                            77
  • Brazil                                  79
  • Ukraine                              83
  • Thailand                            89
  • China                                 91
  • Dominican Republic      102
  • Indonesia                          108
  • Egypt                                  110
  • Philippines                        117
  • South Africa                      118
  • Vietnam                         121
  • Morocco                             129
  • India                                135
  • Taiwan                                n/a
  • Monaco                               n/a

 

So, check this list next time a country claims to be “developing” and in need of multi-lateral or bi-lateral assistance…

 

Michael P. Moore

December 31, 2014

 

moe (at) landminesinafrica (dot) org

 

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One Comment on “Off-Topic: The Maserati Theory of Development”

  1. james cobey says:

    well done call me if you want a duck or a goose. jim

    James C. Cobey, M.D.., M.P.H. 4440 Garfield St.,N.W., Washington, DC, 20007 202 966 2763 (H) 202 494 2965(c) cobey@att.net


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